Explain the physiological and psychological factors that determine how someone may experience pain.

Explain the physiological and psychological factors that determine how someone may experience pain.


Leave a Reply 6

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


jayme2407

jayme2407

Psychological factors exist when we experience pain and can influence how strongly we feel that pain, whether it be situational or emotionally. Attention, understanding, control, expectations, and the aversive significance can affect how we perceive pain too.  The gate-control theory connects the physiological reaction and psychological experience of pain. Memories of pain influence the brain to develop something called chronic pain, this is psychological. Biology of the brain and body are purely physiological. The sociocultural influence on pain either values or disvalues the display of emotions, postural mobility or verbal expression in response to pain or injury. Some cultural groups expect an extravagant display of emotion in the presence of pain, but others value stoicism, restraint and playing down the pain. This impacts both the tolerance for pain and how people deal with pain, either by immediately rushing to a doctor or just trying to walk off something severe. This can also change based on the economic status of where a person lives.  Pain control is both physiological in the fact that the body can respond to pain by releasing endorphins to control pain, and psychological in the fact that the brain can even go without recognizing the body is injured if you do not see a wound.

Explanation:

dward5823

dward5823

i need help on that question too pls help

Explanation:

Jackiecroce12

Jackiecroce12

FAKE ROBOT HI I'M JEFF

Explanation:

latoyatuggle23

latoyatuggle23

“Psychological factors, both situational and emotional factors exist when we experience pain and can profoundly alter the strength of these perceptions. Also, attention, understanding, control, expectations, and the aversive significance can affect pain perceptions.” Pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

“Physiological signs of pain may include: dilation of the pupil and/ or wide opening of the eyelids. Change in blood pressure and heart rate. Increased respiration rate and/or depth.” Www.vet.ed.ac.uk

“This theory suggest that the spinal cord contains a neurological “gate” that either blocks pain signals or allows them to continue on to the brain.” Www.verywellmind.com

kendelllh

kendelllh

Psychological factors exist when we experience pain and can influence how strongly we feel that pain, whether it be situational or emotionally. Attention, understanding, control, expectations, and the aversive significance can affect how we perceive pain too. The gate-control theory connects the physiological reaction and psychological experience of pain. Memories of pain influence the brain to develop something called chronic pain, this is psychological. Biology of the brain and body are purely physiological. The sociocultural influence on pain either values or disvalues the display of emotions, postural mobility or verbal expression in response to pain or injury. Some cultural groups expect an extravagant display of emotion in the presence of pain, but others value stoicism, restraint and playing down the pain. This impacts both the tolerance for pain and how people deal with pain, either by immediately rushing to a doctor or just trying to walk off something severe. This can also change based on the economic status of where a person lives. Pain control is both physiological in the fact that the body can respond to pain by releasing endorphins to control pain, and psychological in the fact that the brain can even go without recognizing the body is injured if you do not see a wound.

Explanation:

chrisswid

chrisswid

my sincerest apologies for the late answer

Psychological factors exist when we experience pain and can influence how strongly we feel that pain, whether it be situational or emotionally. Attention, understanding, control, expectations, and the aversive significance can affect how we perceive pain too. The gate-control theory connects the physiological reaction and psychological experience of pain. Memories of pain influence the brain to develop something called chronic pain, this is psychological. Biology of the brain and body are purely physiological. The sociocultural influence on pain either values or disvalues the display of emotions, postural mobility or verbal expression in response to pain or injury. Some cultural groups expect an extravagant display of emotion in the presence of pain, but others value stoicism, restraint and playing down the pain. This impacts both the tolerance for pain and how people deal with pain, either by immediately rushing to a doctor or just trying to walk off something severe. This can also change based on the economic status of where a person lives. Pain control is both physiological in the fact that the body can respond to pain by releasing endorphins to control pain, and psychological in the fact that the brain can even go without recognizing the body is injured if you do not see a wound.